Srinjay Chakravarti

 

 

*

the tattered scarecrow:

a raven perches

on its shoulder

*

fireflies . . .

sparks from a hammer

on the anvil

*

spring dust

sparrows squabble

in the forenoon

*

a dry leaf

on the ground . . .

a death’s head moth

*

a silent gong

inside the pagoda . . .

breaking dawn

*

cicadas’ abacus. . .

Grandmother

counts her beads

 

 

Srinjay Chakravarti is based in Salt Lake City, Calcutta, India. His creative writing has appeared in over 100 publications in 30-odd countries. His first poetry collection received the Salt Literary Award (1995). He has won a $7,500 Dorothy Prize (2008). Website: www.srinjaychakravarti.com

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Maureen Kingston

 

 

 

Hooking Up

Civilization writ large shouts “all roads lead to Rome.” Civilization writ small builds the roads. The paper clip’s one of the latter, a civilizational bit player that resembles all the other clips swimming in the jar. Its thrill-seeking kin—safari cotter pins, mountain climbing pitons—aspire to great heights, but the paper clip rarely ventures beyond the bureaucratic pond. Occasionally, though, some DIY fool experiments, tries to make it a star.

An old man enters a pink bathroom, arranges his tools just so on a yellow towel: reading glasses; bailing cups; an uncoiled paper clip. He stares into the void before plunging his hands into cold tank-water. After considerable sunken wrestling, the old man successfully loops the paper clip, bowties handle to ball chain. It’s what he can still do to bring a smile to her face.

shotgun wedding . . .
wild horseradish spreads
barbarian roots

 

 

Maureen Kingston’s poems and prose have appeared or are forthcoming in B O D Y, Akitsu Quarterly, Contemporary Haibun Online, Failed Haiku: A Journal of English Senryu, Gone Lawn, Gyroscope Review, KYSO, MacQueen’s Quinterly, Modern Poetry Quarterly Review, and riverbabble. A few of her poems and prose pieces have also been nominated for Best of the Net and Pushcart awards.

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Louise Hopewell

 

 

 

*

dry gully
not the friend
I thought you were

*

the boss says
it’s optional
yellow-bellied blacksnake

*

crumpled sleeping bag
the rippled reflection
of a freeway pylon

*

Lovers’ Bay
a single set
of seagull prints

*

trampled daffodil
the long shadow
of an elm

 

 

Louise Hopewell is an Australian poet, playwright and songwriter. Her haiku have been widely published, including in Under the Basho, Modern Haiku, and Red Moon Anthology.When not writing, Louise can be found riding her bicycle or playing ukelele. Website: https://louisehopewellwriter.wordpress.com/

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Lavana Kray

 

 

Lavana Kray is from Romania. She has won several awards, including the status of  Master Haiga Artist, from the World Haiku Association. Her work  has been published in many print and online journals.  Currently she is the editor for Cattails Haiga works of the United Haiku and Tanka Society.  This is her blog: http://photohaikuforyou.blogspot.ro

 

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William Keckler

 

 

 

hugging mother’s urn
inner child steps
over sidewalk cracks
      *
first grey hairs
he stands on his hands
before making love
        *
pew pew
some homely holiness
aims at us
         *
talking to a snake
we discover just skin
shed skin listening
          *
big white moth
flies past the red light holds us
pinned to the moon
          *
October cold
making a dead man’s wife’s children’s
pumpkin smile for them

 

 

William Keckler‘s books include Sanskrit of the Body, which was selected by Mary Oliver for the (U.S.) National Poetry Series and published by Penguin. His visual art work was included in the group collection Four Photographers.

 

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Lavana Kray

 


 

 

Lavana Kray is from Iasi – Romania. She has won several awards, including the status of  Master Haiga Artist, from the World Haiku Association. Her work  has been published in many print and online journals.  Currently she is the editor for Cattails Haiga works of the United Haiku and Tanka Society.  This is her blog: http://photohaikuforyou.blogspot.ro

 

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Sonam Chhoki

 

 

*

pressed
in my diary
the guava blossom
you picked
has lost its fragrance

*

rain-soaked
scent of pine duff
I still walk
our favourite slope to watch
paddy ripening in the fields

*

heads thrown back
a pair of black-necked cranes
fling their call to the sky
I hope they will never know
the keening cry of separation

*

stars coursing
in the statuary pines
I no longer pray
but now embrace
solitude in your absence

 

 

Sonam Chhoki finds the Japanese short form poetry resonates with her Tibetan Buddhist upbringing.  She is inspired by her father, Sonam Gyamtsho, the architect of Bhutan’s non-monastic modern education and by her mother, Chhoden Jangmu, who taught her: “Being a girl doesn’t mean you can’t do anything.” She is the principal editor and co-editor of haibun for the United Haiku and Tanka Society journal, cattails.

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